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When I was in New York in September, I met with the amazing people at Dig For Fire.  I’ve admired their work for years, from the fantastic live in-store performances they shoot at Other Music to an awesome Band Of Horses video and now to their relationship with Spotify.  I have been wanting to work for them for a long time.  Finally I had the chance.

They had just gone into the studio with Iron & Wine to film the re-recording of his classic tune “Flightless Bird, American Mouth” for the new Twilight: Breaking Dawn soundtrack.  To add to it, Marketa Irglova from The Swell Season came in to sing harmony on the the track.  They asked if I thought I could cut the video in the two weeks I was in town.  I said ABSOLUTELY!

Currenlty, WordPress.com doesn’t support VH1 embeds.  So if you wanna see it there here it is. The VH1 link has over 70,000 views already!

The ever-brilliant Splice Here blog (soon to be Splice Now) by Steve Cohen lays out the perfect list of questions that every production should answer before they shoot one frame.  If you or someone on your production team can’t answer this question before you start shooting, STOP! and get it answered.  Not knowing the answer can get you in to trouble.  Original link: File-Based Basics « Splice Here.

  1. Production
    Which camera(s) are you using? Which audio recorder?
    What kinds of files are you creating?
    What frame rate, sample rate, timecode rate, raster size are you recording?
  2. Dailies
    Who’s doing them? What do you need for editing, review and conforming?
    Who syncs and how will they do it? Who backs up and when?
    How are drives being moved around; where are they stored?
  3. Editing
    What system will you use? What kind of drives/raid?
    How will you output cut material for review?
    What are you turning over to sound and music?
  4. Conforming
    Will you roll your own or have a post house do it?
    How do you handle visual effects created in your editing room?
    And those created by the vfx team?
    What kinds of files will you use for color correction?
    And for television, a crucial question — when do you convert to HD?

 

Thanks Steve!

In light of some potential work as a cameraman and my impending purchase of the new awesome Canon Rebel T2i, I’ve decided to do a post about my previous camera work.  Here is a sampling of some of my camera work over the years…

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Freddy & Francine – Live @ The Mint 2009

Directed, Shot, and Edited by Robert G. Wilson.  Additional camerawork by Adam Deyoe and Katharine Goldschmidt.  Read the full post here.

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Untitled Sketch Group – FunnyOrDie Internet Comedy Series.  Cinematography by Robert G. Wilson.  Episodes 2 & 3 edited by Robert G. Wilson.  Read the full post here.

At the time of uploading to Funny Or Die, they didn’t support HD uploads.  So, here are HD versions with links to the FOD originals.


USG Episode 2: FOD Link


USG Episode 3: FOD Link


USG Episode 4: FOD Link

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Milo – Emerson College BFA Thesis Documentary

Interesting post from the ever-excellent Silicon Alley Insider: Sorry, There’s No Way To Save The TV Business

As with print-based media, Internet-based distribution generates only a tiny fraction of the revenue and profit that today’s incumbent cable, broadcast, and satellite distribution models do.  As Internet-based distribution gains steam, therefore, most TV industry incumbents will no longer be able to support their existing cost structures.

Here’s the gist: we’re all going to be out of work in five years.  Well, that’s a bit of an exaggeration, but the truth is that I don’t see much of a future for the industry.  THAT IS NOT TO SAY THAT I DON’T LOVE THE BUSINESS AND WANT TO DO THIS FOREVER, but the fact of the matter is, especially with post-production, job levels are taking a nose-dive and revenue streams are not far behind it.  I mean, we already have internet-equipped televisions, internet video on the rise, and more people then ever on the internet, so the technology is there.  How long before the industry has the rug pulled out from under us, just like the newspaper and record industry?

And things are already dead in this town.  What from the Writer’s Strike, the SAG “strike”, and the down economy, I can’t image jobs ever getting back to the levels they were at when I first moved out here.  I don’t want to say that we’ll never find a way to work, but if you’ve got any ideas, I suggest you pick up the phone and call some industry executives, because they want to know.

Quick link to a recent episode of KCRW’s The Business: Below The Line and Under The Gun.  It’s probably the best description of the job market facing us below-the-line’rs in this town.  Only problem is that it doesn’t even address the job market for post-production, because with the addition of technology to all these problems, editorial staffs have gone from double-digit crews to maybe two or three people for multi-million dollar projects! You want to talk about too much supply vs. demand, here is your example #1!

I’d love to hear what anyone has to say about this.  Hell, talk me down if you think I’m crazy.  I would love for someone to make me feel better about this.  Please comment!

I have been friends with J. Claude Deering, the writer/director of Untitled Sketch Group, since we were literally children.  Our families are great friends.  So literally, I jumped at the chance to work with him and our friends Chris Frontiero and Jared Swanson.  Turning Entourage on its head, USG is the story of a group of sketch comedians in Los Angeles who dream of success but find little of it.  I am the cinematographer of all four episodes and edited Episodes 2 and 3.

Untitled Sketch Group: Episode 1
A local LA sketch group get a meeting with a big agency.
Cinematography by Robert Grigsby Wilson
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Untitled Sketch Group: Episode 2
The gang pays a visit to Jonathan to make sure he’s doing them right…

Shot and Edited by Robert Grigsby Wilson.

Untitled Sketch Group: Episode 3
Chris tries to clean up the mess after his hit-and-run accident while Jared and Claude try unsuccessfully to brainstorm new sketch ideas.
Shot and Edited by Robert Grigsby Wilson.

Untitled Sketch Group: Episode 4
The guys from Untitled Sketch Group make a Boost Mobile ad.
Cinematography by Robert Grigsby Wilson
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The trailer I also edited for USG: